Category Archives: cover art

This week, in two images (#SFWApro)

Working on the index, most of the time, I felt like this. Spider-Man, not the giant hands about to crush him (art by John Buscema). They’re the index.

amazingspiderman067But I’d catch my wind and then I’d feel ready for a project to flatten! Art by Chuck Patton.

justiceleague235And now it’s done. Just a little tidying up to do and the whole book’s done. But I’m too fried to detail my struggles now, so I’ll postpone that until another post.

All rights to images reside with current holders.

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Filed under cover art, Nonfiction, Now and Then We Time Travel, Writing

Indexing is Hell (#SFWApro)

So I thought I’d just post some Batman covers I’d already put on FB for a friend of mine.

A striking one by Irv Novick.

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And another reflective cover by Marshall Rogersdetective474

J. Winslow Mortimer isn’t my favorite Bat-artist, but here are a couple of interesting cover hooks. Good stories, too.

detective192detective222Neil Adams is, of course, one of the greats, so here’s a couple of his (including a Christmas story).

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And now one from Jim Aparo, one of the definitive Bat-artists.

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All rights retained by current holder. My weekly wrap-up post will be later today, of course.

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Some more cool covers for Friday morning (#SFWApro)

whelan001Few things are ever cooler than a Michael Whelan cover, this time for Dragonflight.

hectorThis one just looks neat to me. By Hector. And I remember Garve as a good storyteller.

dailybBy Frank Frazetta.

59aRobert LoGrippo penned this one. Way creepier than the novel itself.

dailyb-1Powers of course.

dailyb-4By Robert Shulz. I like it because it’s from 1954, when even something as now unremarkable as Sputnik was pure SF, never mind an actual Mars colony.

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Which path do I choose? (#SFWApro)

I didn’t anticipate finishing the latest draft of Southern Discomforts would leave me so flummoxed?

Since I finished Now and Then We Time Travel, my tale of elves in a small Georgia town has been my primary top-priority project. Combine them and I’ve had a Do This First project dominating my time for around 2.5 years. And before that I had my Demand Media articles, which took up quite a bit of time because they were a steady-paying gig.

Now, though, I’m done with time travel until I get the galleys back from McFarland. And I won’t resume work on Southern Discomforts until after New Year’s (that will give me time to digest the feedback from next month’s critique session). And my mind seems to be fritzing over which project should be top priority next?

1004560_10204616247502130_1245694977156814236_n(Art by Kirby, inks by Ditko. Not only a good metaphor for finding the path, I think it’s a neat cover. All rights with current holder)

Martinis, Girls and Guns is the one I’ve worked on most this week, but I don’t want to set aside all my fiction until it’s finished. I hate it when I have to set aside fiction, and as MGG is a self-published project, I don’t.

Should I resume work on a different novel? Which one? Or maybe lots of short stories? Should I concentrate on writing some paying articles for a bit?

Fortunately I haven’t let my uncertainty paralyze me. I got in a full week of work (or I will have by end of day) so I can afford some navel-gazing. And perhaps by the time I start next week, my navel will have answered.

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Filed under Comics, cover art, Now and Then We Time Travel, Sex for Dinner, Death for Breakfast, Short Stories, Southern Discomfort, Time management and goals, Writing

Paperback covers I like (#SFWApro)

The woman wearing a man’s shirt or pajama top was a common erotic image back in the days when everyone (supposedly) waited until marriage. And wore pajamas. I love the way this cover explains it: sure, she’s in his bedroom in his pajama top, but she’s hiding from a killer! No sexual subtext here, look away, look away.

james-meeseI enjoy “random elements from different stories thrown together for a weird effect” covers such as this one. Art by Robert Engel.

robert-engleA peaceful yet eerie cover from Biro.

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I just think this one looks neat. I read the book a couple of months back.

5207377I don’t often see covers try to depict people in motion. This one does a good job.

dailybAll rights to images with current holders. Art is uncredited except where specified.

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I Love Gervasio Gallardo covers (#SFWApro)

As I used up my review material yesterday, here’s a cover-art post. Gervasio Gallardo was one of the talented artists who worked on the Ballantine Adult Fantasy line of paperbacks. I love his work, for example the cover for George MacDonald’s Lilith.

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Or the spectacular sinking-of-Atlantis cover of Poseidonis.

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Or bringing the pretty for William Morris’ Water of the Wondrous Isles.

Wondrous+postFor horror we have several Lovecraft covers such as this one here (though technically the stories are Derleth mimicking Lovecraft).

gallardo-survivor-1971And for a more fantastical mood, there’s Lovecraft’s Dream Quest of Unknown Kadath.

The-Dream-Quest-of-Unknown-Kadath

As Clark Ashton Smith’s Xiccarph is a more alien setting than Poseidonis, a somewhat weirder, more alien cover.

tumblr_lxbspnwlSY1qhtuebo1_500This post has no purpose other than to say how much I love Gallardo’s art and to show you why. All rights to all images reside with current holder.

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More people staring at me out of book covers (#SFWApro)

So I’m off from today through Monday so you’re getting some posts I already had handy, rather than the usual week-in-review, book roundup, etc. Starting with another look at cover art.

I’ve complained in the past how I hate covers which are just the protagonist staring out at me. But here’s an example of a staring cover that works, because the starer is so obviously a Bad Girl who “knew how to handle men too well.” Though if the best cover blurb they can offer is that Tulsa World thinks it “reads well,” I doubt the contents were memorable.

dailyb-1Next we have one that technically involves someone staring out at us but dang, I think it works just fine.

dailyb-2Next we have a cover which doesn’t grab me at all, but it’s worth noting for the text up top. Imagine a time when a privately printed edition would cost $15 a copy, and that was Serious Money.

dailybCover art uncredited on all three. All rights reside with current holder.

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