Madcap French misadventures: movies watched (#SFWApro)

MIDNIGHT (1939) is a Cinderella-riff in which impoverished gold-digger Claudette Colbert arrive in Paris on the hunt for a rich husband. That’s perfect for wealthy John Barrymore, who convinces Colbert to dangle herself as bait for Barrymore’s wife’s (Mary Astor) wealthy boyfriend. Taxi driver Don Ameche, however, only has to give Colbert one trip before deciding he wants her for his own, leading to his efforts to expose her as a fortune-hunter vs. hers and Barrymore’s efforts to conceal the truth. All of which culminates in Monty Woolly’s court where Colbert has to get divorced from Ameche even though they’re not married … Like the earlier movie Easy Living this allows Colbert to enjoy the luxury and couture of a kept woman without actually compromising her virtue; a real charmer. “The Budapest subway was finished in 1893.”

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THE THREE MUSKETEERS (1973) was neither the first or last adaptation of Dumas’ swashbuckler, but it certainly boasts one of the most impressive casts — Michael York as D’Artagnan, Oliver Reed, Frank Finlay and Richard Chamberlain as the musketeer trio, with Faye Dunaway’s Milady, Charlton Heston’s Cardinal Richeliue and Christopher Lee’s Rochefort as their adversaries and Raquel Welch as York’s lady love. Casting aside, the movie is a mixed bag—fun swashbuckling as they try to save the Queen of France from scandal, but very heavy on slapstick and historical set-pieces (like a court tennis game that serves only to show How They Did Things Back Then). Overall a good one though. “In the Bastille there is no ‘afterwards.’”

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One response to “Madcap French misadventures: movies watched (#SFWApro)

  1. Pingback: Musketeers, Wolverine and a Ravaged America: Movies viewed (#SFWApro) | Fraser Sherman's Blog

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