Ghostbusters in the Twilight Zone: Films and TV watched (#SFWApro)

0004565435-ew-1420ghostbusttersGHOSTBUSTERS (2016) is the all-woman remake starring Kristen Wig and Melissa McCarthy as former ghost-hunting best friends who broke up when Wig turned to serious physics instead. Now they reunite alongside mad scientist Kate McKinnon and Big Apple history buff Leslie Jones to stop disgruntled janitor Neil Casey from unleashing Hell on Earth. Extremely funny (TYG liked it and she’s not a fan of the original) with a cast include Mayor Andy Garcia (“Do not compare me to the mayor in Jaws!”), university dean Charles Dance, Annie Potts as a snide hotel clerk, Dan Ackroyd as a cabbie (“I ain’t afraid of no ghosts.”), Bill Murray as a James Randi-type and Chris Hemsworth as the women’s brain-dead receptionist (there are also cameos for Slimer and Stay-Pufft). I highly recommend this one (all rights to image with current holders). “When the Fourth Cataclysm comes, laborers such as yourself will be the last ones led to the butchery.”

TYG then dredged out my copy of GHOSTBUSTERS (1984) to see if she’d enjoy it more than when she watched it years ago — nope, but I had fun watching Bill Murray do psychic research, Sigourney Weaver finding evil in her fridge, Rick Moranis attempting to make friends and Ernie Hudson promising to believe anything for a paycheck (his character was originally much more competent, but the role was rewritten when plans for a name black star fell through). “What my associate says is right—this man has no dick!”

ROWS (2015) is a horror film in which the protagonist’s efforts to deliver an eviction notice to a spooky old woman in a supposedly haunted house lead to what are either precognitive flashes, hallucinations or time jumps back and forth. One that I might add to the appendix in the proofing stage (lord knows I’ve picked ones with flimsier qualifications); in its own right, a chaotic mess. “Why did you stab that man?”

Rewatching the first season of THE TWILIGHT ZONE, the most striking thing is Rod Serling’s fondness for ordinary guys and out-of-luck losers, from drunken ex-gunfighter Mr. Denton to Jack Klugman’s depressed musician in “A Passage for Trumpet” to the burned-out businessman in “A Stop at Willoughby.” (a fondness which didn’t stop Serling from going tragic, as in “The Big Tall Wish.”). It’s also noteworthy that despite the affection in many scripts, Serling was perfectly aware how horrible we could be, most particularly in “The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street.” Plus of course, despite occasional flops such as “Mr. Bevis,” the stories are mostly excellent. Still worth watching after all these years. “No, it’s not what you need—but it’s exactly what I need.”

DEFIANCE‘s second season (I reviewed the first here) has the city now under control of the Earth Republic, despite which things go on much as before, with various romances at cross-purposes, crime on the streets and the Daytak family entangled in various personal dramas. Still not A-list for me, but still worth watching. “You killed my parents and I loved you for it.”

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